The solitary reaper poem explanation. Study Material and Summary of The Solitary Reaper NCERT Class 9th « Study Rankers 2019-02-07

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LINE BY LINE EXPLANATION OF THE SOLITARYLINE BY LINE EXPLANATION OF THE SOLITARY REAPER

the solitary reaper poem explanation

I think that the poet also meant for the poem to be quite sad and sombre as it adds to the mystery of the reaper. I like reading books about fantasy, and the many different mystical creatures they are based on. The girl, unaware of Wordsworth, keeps on singing spontaneously and continues cutting the grain. Reaping and singing by herself; Stop here, or gently pass! Throughout the course of the poem Wordsworth's voice evolves from being an outsider voice into an insider voice; simultaneous, to the evolution of the voice, Wordsworth uses different ways and means to present the spokesman by itself as an emerging voice, which responds to each changing situation. He was completely engrossed with the song. In the second stanza, the speaker compares the girl's singing to that of a nightingale and a cuckoo bird.


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What is the theme of the poem 'The Solitary Reaper' by William Wordsworth?

the solitary reaper poem explanation

It is obvious that commonly there is no nightingale in the deserts. It was dog-like with sharp teeth, whiskers, a hand becoming a paw, a voice with a ''keening sound''; it scratched and rooted around in the soil with a swishing tail. Such was the impression of the song upon his mind. He further guessed that the reason of the sad songs of the Solitary Reaper to be the deceased kinsmen in the battle. Actually, the poet, being a poet of nature, was profoundly impressed by this natural scene.

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Poetry Summary: The Solitary Reaper: William Wordsworth

the solitary reaper poem explanation

One can generalize a statement of a pattern that develops as the matrix goes on. In the third stanza, the speaker tries to imagine what the song might be about. The poet says that first he listened to her song standing still and motionless. It could be related to natural deaths in family and friends; loss of near and dear ones; separation between the loved ones etc. The girl is reaping and singing all by herself.

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William Wordsworth's The Solitary Reaper: Summary & Analysis

the solitary reaper poem explanation

The poet saw the girl singing as she bent over her sickle. But the notes produced by her chant are flowing all over the profound valley. He preferred a simple familiar girl of a peasant as the subject of his poem. They the poet asserts the song to be an ordinary song. Much of what makes this poem so intriguing is the fact that the speaker does not understand the words being sung. Its an analzis of a poem by William Wordsworth - Jennifer Lasky Ms.

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Solitary by William Wordsworth. Poem analysis.

the solitary reaper poem explanation

Autoplay next video Behold her, single in the field, Yon solitary Highland Lass! This part of the sentence may relate to natural disasters and diseases which might have become the reason for the end of many lives. The song is in some different language but Wordsworth likes this song very much. In the third stanza the reader learns that the speaker cannot understand the words being sung. Alone she cuts and binds the grain, And sings a melancholy strain; O listen! The poem extols the beauty of music and the awesome feelings that emanates from it. Once he passes a valley and listens to the song of a girl. The song of the maiden was so mesmerising and spellbinding that it held the poet motionless and still. This is done just to round off the poem and give it a more rational ending.

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William Wordsworth's The Solitary Reaper: Summary & Analysis

the solitary reaper poem explanation

Given its sad tune, he speculates that her song might be about some past sorrow, pain or loss 'of old, unhappy things' or battles fought long ago. He is so struck by the sad beauty of her song that the whole valley seems to overflow with its sound. He says that the song she sings is more welcome than any a nightingale might sing to weary travelers in the desert, and the sound of the her voice is more thrilling to hear than the cuckoo-bird in spring. And Wordsworth reaches his goal using the comparison as the means of transportation, comparing the maiden's song with a Nightingale and the newness of the notes and their unique quality. To the poet, the song of the girl is sweeter than and superior to that of the song of the nightingale and the cuckoo bird. Either way, he notes that she's singing as if her song will never end.


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A Critical Summary of Solitary Reaper

the solitary reaper poem explanation

He desribed nature not as something beautiful, but as an expression of the 'spirit' and the 'music of humanity'. The nightingale sings to welcome the weary travelers in the Arabian desert. The voyage seemed extremely safe and. Her song was echoing in the whole valley and could be heard even beyond it. While reaping, she is singing continuously. The poet is enchanted by the song of the girl and stands still and not allowing anybody to make any sort of noise and disturbance.

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SparkNotes: Wordsworth’s Poetry: “The Solitary Reaper”

the solitary reaper poem explanation

I think that the wording has an unvarying sombre tone. Wordsworth expressed his democratic view towards mankind by bringing forth this simple Scottish maiden, who happens to be the central character and theme of the poem. The beauty of nature is also expressed. . He described many amazing tours of the British Mountains. Alone she cuts and binds the grain, And sings a melancholy strain; O listen! An objection may be raised for how Wordsworth could like the song without understanding it.

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What is the theme of the poem 'The Solitary Reaper' by William Wordsworth?

the solitary reaper poem explanation

Q2 Why did the poet compare the song of the solitary reaper with those of the nightingales and cuckoo bird? This poem is unique because it is based on the experience of someone else, author and friend Thomas Wilkinson as described in his Tours to the British Mountains, not on Wordsworth's own personal experiences. Form The four eight-line stanzas of this poem are written in a tight iambic tetrameter. Whate'er the theme, the Maiden sang As if her song could have no ending; I saw her singing at her work, And o'er the sickle bending;-- I listened, motionless and still; And, as I mounted up the hill, The music in my heart I bore, Long after it was heard no more. This is clearly seen from the title of the poem. So he made all sorts of guesses.

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