Sonnet 130 summary. Analysis of Shakespeare's Sonnet 130 essays 2019-02-12

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Analysis of Shakespeare's Sonnet 130 essays

sonnet 130 summary

I used to feel conflicted having to do that in my literary classes: But with that said, I tend to go how it makes me feel and I feel like its a more of a statement on how narrow the idea of beauty was over a declaration of love which came in a distant second You have missed the important point of this sonnet , it is not about the early blooming of love in youthful passion but the lasting love and friendship that endears us to our chosen one. Our speaker has seen beautiful roses like that, but his mistress's cheeks don't remind him of them at all. If hairs are like wires, hers are black and not golden. In fact, some coral is white. While Shakespeare was regarded as the foremost dramatist of his time, evidence indicates that both he and his contemporaries looked to poetry, not playwriting, for enduring fame. Literary Devices Shakespeare uses metaphor, or a figure of speech that makes a point through comparison, all throughout his sonnet. With his share of the income from the Globe, Shakespeare was able to purchase New Place, his home in Stratford.

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Sonnet 130: My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun by William Shakespeare

sonnet 130 summary

Most sonnets, including others written by Shakespeare, praised women and practically deified them. I have seen roses damasked, red and white, But no such roses see I in her cheeks; And in some perfumes is there more delight Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. He is widely regarded as the greatest English writer of all time, and wrote 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and 38 plays, though recently another play has been found and attributed to William Shakespeare. If a lover thinks that his believed is beautiful, then she is beautiful. I found this an interesting insight on this sonnet! It is quite a stretch to reach this conclusion, and it is not the popular interpretation of the poem, however an argument can be made that the poetic speaker spends an inordinate amount of time describing his mistress down to the bare bones.

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Shakespeare's Sonnet 130: Summary, Tone & Literary Devices

sonnet 130 summary

He loves her for what the reality is, and not because he can compare her to beautiful things. It also has a tone to it that signals some meaning to it. Dun is a word often used to describe the color of a horse, and definitely not the kind of thing a woman would be thrilled to hear about her breasts. The poet must be very secure in his love for his mistress — and hers for him — for him to be as disparaging as he is, even in jest — a security he did not enjoy with the young man. If you found this analysis of Sonnet 130 useful, you can discover more about the Sonnets. What more could one ask? After reading this sonnet the reader finds other love poems superficial and thinks that it is shocking how women were reduced on their appearance. In this times women were not seen as individuals with own talents, so every woman had to have a wonderful voice to sing with.

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Shakespeare’s Sonnets Sonnet 130

sonnet 130 summary

It was one of the basic things women were taught while they were living at home. Glossary dun tan or mud-colored. The sonnet is generally considered a humorous parody of the typical love sonnet. Either because of her pretty visual nature, which he just needs to compare with different precious things, or because of her wonderful inner values, which you cannot see immediately but have to find out. He goes through a whole laundry list, giving us details about the flaws of her body, her smell, even the sound of her voice.

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Sonnet 130

sonnet 130 summary

This shows that she actually is not worthy to be loved, but the final couplet is a complete turnaround: The speaker announces that he loves her, independent from the ideals of beauty men had. During that period, Shakespeare probably had some income from his patron, Henry Wriothesley, earl of Southampton, to whom he dedicated his first two poems, Venus and Adonis 1593 and The Rape of Lucrece 1594. A graceful goddess is the most perfect being the speaker can think of. I love to hear her speak, yet well I know I love to hear her speak, but I know That music hath a far more pleasing sound; That music has a more pleasing sound. And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare And yet I think my love as rare As any she belied with false compare. Many poets of the time used this term as a benchmark of beauty, including Spenser: Some angel she had been, Her long loose yellow locks like golden wire, Sprinkled with pearl, and pearling flowers atween, Do like a golden mantle her attire, And being crowned with a garland green. Analyzing the Sonnet Sonnet 130 is starkly different in theme than Shakespeare's other sonnets.

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Shakespeare Sonnet 130 Analysis: My mistress' eyes are nothing like (...)

sonnet 130 summary

With starting this way the speaker shows the expectations made for women they had to fulfil to be seen as beauty. Compared to the whiteness of snow, her breasts are grayish-brown. Whereas conventional love sonnets by other poets make their women into goddesses, in Sonnet 130 the poet is merely amused by his own attempt to deify his dark mistress. To the same extent that many romantic poets exaggerate the beauty of their mistresses, insisting that their eyes are more beautiful than the sun, their hair fairer than hold or their cheeks redder than roses, Shakespeare decides to exaggerate how unattractive his mistress is. Love then ceases to be intent on appearances and focuses on character. My opinion is we will never be able to really know what went through any writers head. He goes so far as to condemn the smell of her, and the sound of her voice.

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Analysis of Shakespeare's Sonnet 130

sonnet 130 summary

The sonnet: its origin, structure, and place in poetry. A poet could praise a woman for having skin as white as snow. And on the other hand the value is increasing: from an almost useless coral to a priceless goddess. I have seen roses damasked, red and white, But no such roses see I in her cheeks; And in some perfumes is there more delight Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. The speaker is not talking for somebody else, but for himself and his own mistress.

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Analysis and Interpretation of William Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 130”

sonnet 130 summary

In the couplet, then, the speaker shows his full intent, which is to insist that love does not need these conceits in order to be real; and women do not need to look like flowers or the sun in order to be beautiful. In the first quatrain, the speaker spends one line on each comparison between his mistress and something else the sun, coral, snow, and wires—the one positive thing in the whole poem some part of his mistress is like. In this sonnet, Shakespeare exaggerates to make a point. He hyperbolizes the ideals of beauty. Roses are also a sign for love and passion, so again the mistress is questioned in fulfilling her role as a woman who is supposed to please a man. Usually, if you were talking about your beloved, you would go out of your way to praise her, to point all the ways that she is the best.


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Sonnet 130

sonnet 130 summary

Despite her shortcomings, the poet insists that he loves her, not because she is a goddess, not because she is an unattainable beauty, but because she is his, and because she is real. Petrarch, the first modern scholar and man of letters. He is stating in these lines that his lover's eyes, lips, or breast are no comparison to the beautiful things, such as the sunshine rays of the sun, the redness of coral, and the whiteness of snow. The face and features of Shakespeare as 'imaged' in that portrait are those with which his readers are probably most familiar. In one sonnet the only reason the speaker loves his woman is because she looks beautiful, and in the other the speaker loves her although she does not look handsome in the eyes of most men. Also, although he has never seen a goddess, he knows that goddess doesn't walk on ground. Sting says that the best way to deal with drunks is to quote Shakespeare at them and in this case he quoted the first line of this sonnet.

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Shakespeare's Sonnet 130

sonnet 130 summary

His comparison gives the reader a good idea of what his lover looks like. Little is known about Shakespeare's activities between 1585 and 1592. We hope for relationships that are based on honesty, and with honesty comes depth and acceptance. Usually, most Elizabethan love poetry was written in the tradition of the Petrarchan sonnet. Or perhaps she is deserving but such words are not necessary, as though the narrator feels comfortable enough with the dark lady that he is able to show such honesty which his insecurity regarding the fair lord prevents him from doing? In Sidney's work, for example, the features of the poet's lover are as beautiful and, at times, more beautiful than the finest pearls, diamonds, rubies, and silk. Shakespeare uses reeks often in his serious work, which illustrates the modern meaning of the word was common. Contemporary poets, such as Sidney and Watson, would use the Petrarchan sonnet for its poetic form, whereas in Sonnet 130, Shakespeare mocks all the conventions of it.


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