Life of the venetian courtesan. Veronica Franco, Venetian Courtesans, and Female Portraiture 2019-03-03

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Veronica Franco: The Life of a Courtesan in Renaissance Venice and Her Influence on the Analysis of Female Portraiture, Elizabeth Paredes

life of the venetian courtesan

Veronica Franco 1546—1591 was an Italian poet and courtesan in 16th century Venice. This wasn't uncommon for women in the profession during this time. The women from the first class of courtesan, the honest courtesan, were often born into patrician or merchant family they were raised as educated and cultured women. Many such women became so powerful socially and financially that they could be particular about the men they associated with; in other words they chose their paramour as would any other mistress, not the other way around. Though lower class courtesans cortigiana di lume would most closely resemble the idea of a prostitute, it was those of the higher class that were drastically different from these expectations of courtesans in Venice. A well-educated woman, Veronica Franco wrote two volumes of poetry: Terze rime in 1575 and Lettere familiari a diversi in 1580. It was usually their wit and personality that set them apart from regular women.

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Veronica Franco, Venetian Courtesans, and Female Portraiture

life of the venetian courtesan

It is Veronica Franco's insight into the power conflicts between men and women—and her awareness of the threat she posed to her male contemporaries—that makes her literary works and her dealings with Venetian intellectuals so pertinent today. In 1577, she unsuccessfully proposed to the city council that it should establish a home for poor women, of which she would become the administrator. A graduate of West Virginia University in both Journalism and English, she has always had a great interest and fascination for history. However, this seemed to have little effect on the women and they would proceed with their chosen way of life despite the obstacles that men instilled upon them. If you want to know the true story of this Dangerous Beauty after seeing the Hollywood production of her life , this is where you will find it.

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r4cloud.com: The Honest Courtesan: Veronica Franco, Citizen and Writer in Sixteenth

life of the venetian courtesan

Biography: Franco, Veronica Franco, Veronica 1546-1591 , Venetian Courtesan Poet Veronica Franco was born in Venice into a family who were native-born citizens with hereditary rights. Their wealth also meant that they could afford expensive clothing, food and other luxuries. Not only did the government have the power to control the areas allotted to the courtesans, but they felt it necessary to have a say in their wardrobe as well. Prior to the Renaissance, courtesans served to convey information to visiting dignitaries, when servants could not be trusted. Written as a scholarly account of the life of Veronica Franco.

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Dangerous Beauty

life of the venetian courtesan

In 1577, she proposed to the city council to establish a home for poor women and that she become administrator of the home, but was unsuccessful in bringing it about. Eventually, her last major died and left her with no financial support. Archived from on July 28, 2008. Franco became a cortigiana onesta honest courtesan in the mid to late 1560s and soon became famed for the intellectual and culture entertainments she provided. When a scorned suitor dragged her before the Inquisition on charges of witchcraft, Franco defended herself without the aid of a lawyer and won her appeal. Although sex workers were abundant, the elite men of Venice were highly concerned with their status and could not be seen to be involved with lower-class women. This was because the commercial sex trade served as an outlet for men and their sexual needs while it prevented the respectable, well to-do women from being sexually attacked.

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The Venetian Courtesan of the Renaissance

life of the venetian courtesan

Grandes Horizontales: The Lives and Legends of Four Nineteenth-Century Courtesans. When we think of courtesans today, an image of the archetypal prostitute may spring to mind. Veronica Franco was perhaps the most celebrated member of the former category, although Franco was hardly the only onesta in 16th-century Venice who could boast of a fine education and considerable literary and artistic accomplishments. Some of the well to-do men, whose concern was for the morals of the citizens, saw the courtesans as sinful, wicked, and dirty women who lured men into participating in ungodly acts before they proceeded in depleting them of their money. It was the government that designated appropriate spaces for men and women in the city, thus decreasing the possibilities for courtesans to come across clientele. They then accused her of the witchcraft and of not respecting the holy days for fasting.

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A Pearl Rebellion: The Pearl and the Venetian Courtesan

life of the venetian courtesan

For example, the title was applied to the Byzantine empress , who had started life as an erotic actress but later became the wife of the Emperor and, after her death, an. Veronica Franco was perhaps the most celebrated member of the former category, although she was hardly the only onesta in 16th-century Venice who could boast of a fine education and considerable literary and artistic accomplishments. Sexually transmitted diseases were still a threat, and during the mid-15th century to the mid-16th century, one of the most dangerous was syphilis. She published books of letters and collected the works of other leading writers into anthologies. For example, they were well-dressed and ready to engage and participate in a variety of topics ranging from art to music to politics. Guest article by Sarah Moses Venice, Italy may be known for many things, including its streets of water and its gondolas, but centuries ago, it was also known for its venetian courtesans. Franco loved her city dearly, so naturally when Venice needed aid she was one of the first to act.

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Dangerous Beauty

life of the venetian courtesan

An example is the famous Veronica Franco, whose mother inducted her into the profession. And the leaders of this rebellion, were the Venetian courtesans. Not too occasionally, courtesans were extremely well educated, sometimes highly regarded, and often, had quite a bit of covert political influence. Such competition often gave rise to faction fighting- sometimes fought desperately over bridges like the Rialto. Rather than go to a convent, Veronica's mother suggests she become a , a highly paid, cultured prostitute like her mother and grandmother before her.

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The Honest Courtesan: Veronica Franco, Citizen and Writer in Sixteenth

life of the venetian courtesan

He was the one who helped her get her works published, and also helped her later on during the Inquisition. No shawls or ruffles up to the neck for these bawdy lasses! I have neither read Capitaine Fracasse nor Moi, Veronica France, Courtisane a Venise — but I should like to very much. Being sex workers, courtesans were at high risk of contracting sexually transmitted diseases. Veronica Franco did not limit herself to being a courtesan, but pursued her own literary interests. In many letters, she portrays herself as a moralist, giving advice to patrician male friends and to a mother thinking of making her daughter into a courtesan. Perhaps the most well known of these Venetian courtesans is Veronica Franco. Not a time to project the prim and proper, and in this age of fifty shades, many of us might proudly squeeze into our skinny jeans and corsets; proudly wear our full skirts, bustles and bows, our kitten heels and stilettos, lace and faux fur, and our best lipstick, and practice safely and sensibly of course that age old female talent.


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Veronica Franco, Venetian Courtesans, and Female Portraiture

life of the venetian courtesan

They selected clothing from these groups of women in order to create individualized styles. The courtesans of East Asia, particularly those of the , held a different social role than that of their European counterparts. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1992 Schuler, Carol M. Married to Paolo Panizza, a doctor, in an arranged union in the early 1560s, Franco separated from him soon after as her wills of 1564 and 1570 attest because she requests her dowry to be returned to her. Religious zealots take the war and plague as punishment for the city's moral degradation, and Veronica's home is quarantined and almost ransacked by a mob. For that ultra-seductive vintage-inspired look, keep the bodice low, and the pearls long.


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Courtesan

life of the venetian courtesan

In the novel, the courtesan's name is Marguerite Gautier; in the opera, it is Violetta Valéry. Franco was the only daughter among the family's three sons. Being a courtesan, was a serious and valid career choice, in an age when not much freedom was given to women. Great Britain: Cambridge University Press, 1993. This conundrum was solved through hiring courtesans, or in other words, up-market sex workers.

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